The International Society for Industrial Ecology in close collaboration with the International Resource Panel (IRP) and the NTNU Sustainability have hosted two webinars where the modelling work (webinar 1 on 18th February) and the policy review (webinar 2 on 26th February) in the IRP report Resource Efficiency and Climate Change: Material Efficiency Strategies for a Low-Carbon Future have been presented and discussed.


 
Webinar 1: Material efficiency strategies for a low-carbon future: an insight into the modelling

Date and time: 18th February, 2021, 3:00pm-4:30pm (CET)

This event presented the details of the modelling carried out for the development of the work. The open science website of the modeling is here.

The authors have presented their contribution, and how the modelling of material efficiency of buildings and transport have been structured.

Programme
  • Welcome - Elsa Olivetti

  • The carbon footprint of materials and the need to model material efficiency - Edgar Hertwich

  • Archetype models of material efficiency in buildings - Niko Heeren

  • Material efficiency in light-duty vehicles - Qingshi Tu and Paul Wolfram

  • Scenario development for buildings and light-duty vehicles - Tomer Fishman

  • Tracing material flows through product cohorts - the ODYM-RECC framework for assessing resource use over time - Stefan Pauliuk

  • Scenario results – GHG emission reductions from material efficiency - Edgar Hertwich

  • Outlook - Stefan Pauliuk

  • Discussion - Elsa Olivetti

Recording


 
Webinar 2: Material efficiency strategies for a low-carbon future: a policy perspective

Date and time: 26th February, 2021, 2:00pm-3:30pm (CET)

The webinar focused on material efficiency policies for homes and cars, highlighting the connections between climate change and resource efficiency. It was moderated by Reid Lifset.

Programme

Introduction - 40 minutes

  • Introduction to the IRP and its work on RECC, by María José Baptista, United Nations Environment Programme

  • Modelling results of the report, by Edgar Hertwich, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

  • Results from the policy review, by Reid Lifset, Yale University

  • Material Efficiency policy and intensity of use, by Tamar Makov, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

  • Q&A

Panel discussion - 45 minutes

  • Rodrigo Rodríguez Tornquist, Member of the IRP Steering Committee, Secretary for Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Innovation, Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development of Argentina

  • Maarten Hajer, IRP member and distinguished professor Urban Futures and Director of the Urban Futures Studio, Utrecht University

  • Tiffany Vass, International Energy Agency

Recording

Speaker quotes

reid_lifset
 

“Looking at residential buildings: design is cross cutting. It influences multiple strategies: material choice, construction technology, building use or end of life, but it's not typically subject to regulation, per se. But when material standards and building codes are adopted by governments, they become, de facto, policy. Most of the standards and codes that we found were related to energy efficiency.”

Reid Lifset, IRP member, Research Scholar and Resident Fellow in Industrial Ecology at Yale University, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Industrial Ecology

 

 

“Enhancing utilization is one of the most effective ways that we can have both a win, win in terms of material efficiency and climate change.”

Tamar Makov, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Business & Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

 

 

"I think that we should consider transforming these findings into policy actions. What we call in the transport sector, the three revolutions: the change of the paradigm of one car per person to the electric shared and autonomous mobility systems.”

Rodrigo Rodriguez Tornquist, Member of the IRP Steering Committee, Secretary for Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Innovation, Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development of Argentina

 

 

“If you look at the elements of the report […] we need to think in terms of concepts like neighborhoods, thinking in terms of the 50-minute cities, which is very trendy in Europe at the moment. Avoiding people to need to move around, having everything at walking distance, these are game changers.”

Maarten Hajer, IRP member and distinguished professor Urban Futures and Director of the Urban Futures Studio, Utrecht University

 

 

“It seems that will need all different levels of governments so there's maybe some policies that we can have coming from the federal government level or a national government level. But in terms of these types of policies will probably also need local governments involved so working on things like zoning regulations, building codes, parking requirements."

Tiffany Vass, Energy & Industry researcher at International Energy Agency

 

edgar_hertwich
 

“I absolutely think that cultural aspects are quite important, whether this is the design of the buildings or the preferences for transportation, and it is something we need to take into account.”

Edgar Hertwich, IRP member, International Chair of Industrial Ecology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Executive Fellow at the Yale School of Environment